Aciclovir 400mg tabs

£17.99£49.49

Aciclovir anti-viral tablets are a Cost-effective treatment for fast, effective relief from current and future outbreaks of herpes.

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Medication

Product Description

What is Aciclovir?

Aciclovir is an antiviral medicine, which acts on infected cells by stopping the virus growing. This reduces the severity of the infection and stops it from spreading. In additional to clearing up an outbreak, Aciclovir can be prescribed to prevent herpes outbreaks from occurring.
Aciclovir 400mg tablets are used to:
• treat or prevent herpes simplex infections of the skin and mucous membranes e.g. cold sores and genital herpes (except in children whose immune system workless well and they are unable to fight infections)

For more information about Genital herpes, click here.

How do you take Aciclovir?

Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
It is important to start treatment as soon as possible. Swallow the tablets with water, with or without food.

• Herpes simplex infection (e.g. cold sores, genital herpes)
Adults
• treatment – 400mg 3 times a day at 6 hourly intervals for 5 days
• prevention – 400mg 2 times a day at 8 hourly intervals for upto 6-12 months

How long does it take for it to work?

The sooner aciclovir is taken the better the chance of easing symptoms, aciclovir needs to be started within 5 days of the symptoms appearing.
The severity and length of an outbreak can be greatly reduced if taken within this time frame and you may notice an improvement within two or three days.
Outbreaks usually last around one week.

Aciclovir can be used to treat both oral and genital herpes.

Recurrent outbreaks

Recurrent outbreaks are usually milder than the first episode of genital herpes. Over time, outbreaks tend to happen less often and be less severe. Some people never have outbreaks.

Some people who have more than 6 outbreaks in a year may benefit from taking antiviral medicine for 6 to 12 months. If you still have outbreaks of genital herpes during this time, you may be referred to a specialist.

See our other genital herpes treatments here.

Genital Herpes

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) passed on through vaginal, anal and oral sex.

Symptoms

Symptoms clear up on their own but can come back.
Go to a sexual health clinic as soon as possible if you have:
small blisters that burst to leave red, open sores around your genitals, anus, thighs or buttocks
tingling, burning or itching around your genitals
pain when you pee
in women, vaginal discharge that’s not usual for you
Go even if you haven’t had sex for a long time, as blisters can take months or years to appear.

Symptoms might not appear for weeks or even years after you’re infected with the herpes virus.

If you have genital herpes, your previous sexual partners should get tested.

Treatment for genital herpes

There’s no cure. Symptoms clear up by themselves but the blisters can come back (an outbreak or recurrence). Treatment from a sexual health clinic can help.

Treatment the first time you have genital herpes

You may be prescribed:

antiviral medicine to stop the symptoms getting worse – you need to start taking this within 5 days of the symptoms appearing
cream for the pain
If you’ve had symptoms for more than 5 days before you go to a sexual health clinic, you can still get tested to find out the cause.

Treatment if the blisters come back

Go to your GP or a sexual health clinic if you’ve been diagnosed with genital herpes and need treatment for an outbreak.

Antiviral medicine may help shorten an outbreak by 1 or 2 days, if you start taking it as soon as symptoms appear. But outbreaks usually settle by themselves, so you may not need treatment.

Recurrent outbreaks are usually milder than the first episode of genital herpes. Over time, outbreaks tend to happen less often and be less severe. Some people never have outbreaks.

Some people who have more than 6 outbreaks in a year may benefit from taking antiviral medicine for 6 to 12 months. If you still have outbreaks of genital herpes during this time, you may be referred to a specialist.

How to deal with outbreaks yourself

If you’ve been diagnosed with genital herpes and you’re having an outbreak:

Do

keep the area clean using plain or salt water to prevent blisters becoming infected
apply an ice pack wrapped in a flannel to soothe pain
apply petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline) or painkilling cream (such as 5% lidocaine) to reduce pain when you pee
wash your hands before and after applying cream or jelly
pee while pouring water over your genitals to ease the pain

Don’t

do not wear tight clothing that may irritate blisters or sores
do not put ice directly on the skin
do not touch your blisters or sores unless you’re applying cream
do not have vaginal, anal or oral sex until the sores have gone away
How genital herpes is passed on
Genital herpes is very easy to pass on (contagious) from the first tingling or itching of a new outbreak (before any blisters appear) to when sores have fully healed.

You can get genital herpes:

from skin-to-skin contact with the infected area – including vaginal, anal and oral sex
when there are no visible sores or blisters
if a cold sore touches your genitals
by transferring the infection on fingers from someone else to your genitals
by sharing sex toys with someone who has herpes
You can’t get genital herpes:
from objects such as towels, cutlery or cups – the virus dies very quickly when away from your skin
Protecting against genital herpes

You can reduce the chances of passing herpes on by:

using a condom every time you have vaginal, anal or oral sex – but herpes can still be passed on if the condom doesn’t cover the infected area
avoiding vaginal, anal or oral sex if you or your partner has blisters or sores, or a tingle or itch that means an outbreak is coming
not sharing sex toys – if you do, wash them and put a condom on them

Why genital herpes comes back

Genital herpes is caused by a virus called herpes simplex. Once you have the virus, it stays in your body.

It won’t spread in your body to cause blisters elsewhere. It stays in a nearby nerve and causes blisters in the same area.

If you can, avoid things that trigger your symptoms.

Side Effects

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.
Contact your doctor at once if you have a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) such as swelling of the face, lips,
tongue or throat (angioedema), difficulty breathing or swallowing.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any of the following effects or any not listed.

Common (may affect more than 1 in 10 people):
dizziness,headache, feeling or being sick, diarrhoea, stomach pain, skin
rashes, itching, tiredness, sensitivity to sunlight or artificial light (e.g. sunbeds), fever.
Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people): pale or red irregular raised patches with severe itching (hives), hair loss

see the patient information leaflet for a full list of side effects.

Further Information