Melatonin 3mg Tablets (30)

£27.99

  • Treats The Symptoms Of Jet Lag
  • Active Ingredient: Melatonin
  • Buy With Confidence From UK Registered Pharmacy
  • Includes Free Prescription

Melatonin tablets contain the active substance melatonin. Melatonin tablets can be used for treatment of jet-lag in adults. Jet-lag can be recognized by sleep disturbances, daytime tiredness, fatigue, mild mental impairment, irritability and digestive system disturbances experienced after flying.

3 mg once daily, increased if necessary to 6 mg once daily for up to 5 days, the first dose should be taken at the habitual bedtime after arrival at destination. Doses should not be taken before 8pm or after 4am. Maximum of 16 treatment courses per year.

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SKU: Melatonin 3mg Tablets (30) Categories: ,

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Product Description

What Melatonin tablets are and what they are used for

Melatonin tablets contain the active substance melatonin. Melatonin tablets can be used for treatment of jet-lag in adults.

Jet Lag is caused by disruption to your normal sleep pattern that is usually caused by travelling on long-distance flights over multiple time zones.

Jet Lag may cause the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty sleeping at night and waking in the morning
  • Tiredness and fatigue in the day
  • Poor quality sleep
  • Difficulty concentrating and remembering
  • Indigestion, nausea, constipation

Jet Lag normally improves within a few days without treatment, however, taking Melatonin can help improve your quality of sleep from day-one making it easier for you to enjoy your trip or to adjust more quickly to normal life after arriving home.

How Melatonin tablets work

Melatonin is a hormone produced by the body that synchronizes the body’s biological day-and-night rhythm. The biological rhythm can be disturbed by travelling across time zones. This is known as jet-lag. The symptoms and their severity vary between individuals, but are generally worse and last longer the more time zones are crossed. Melatonin tablets can help restore the normal day-and-night rhythm and reduce the symptoms.

You must talk to a doctor if you do not feel better or if you feel worse after 5 days.

See more information on Jet Lag here on the NHS webiste.

Before you use Melatonin tablets

Do not take Melatonin tablets:

  • if you are allergic to melatonin or any of the other ingredients of this medicine

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Melatonin tablets:

  • if you have epilepsy. Melatonin may increase seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy
  • if you have an autoimmune disease (where the body is ‘attacked’ by its own immune system)
  • if you have diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, as this medicine may increase the level of glucose in your blood
  • if you suffer from significantly impaired liver function or kidney function
  • if you smoke. Smoking may reduce the effect of Melatonin tablets as components of tobacco smoke can increase the breakdown of melatonin by the liver.

How to take Melatonin tablets for jet lag

3 mg once daily, increased if necessary to 6 mg once daily for up to 5 days, the first dose should be taken at the habitual bedtime after arrival at destination. Doses should not be taken before 8pm or after 4am. Maximum of 16 treatment courses per year.

Ingredients

  • Each film-coated tablet contains 3 mg of the active substance melatonin.
  • The other ingredients are: cellulose microcrystalline, maltodextrin, silica coloidal anhydrous, magnesium stearate. Coating: hypromellose, lactose monohydrate, titanium dioxide and macrogol 4000.

 

See our full range of Jet Lag Treatments here at My Pharmacy.

 

Jet Lag

Jet lag is when your normal sleep pattern is disturbed after a long flight. Symptoms usually improve within a few days as your body adjusts to the new time zone.

Ways to reduce jet lag

Jet lag can’t be prevented, but there are things you can do to reduce its effects.

Before you travel

Do

get plenty of rest
relax before going to bed and follow good sleep practices
gradually change your sleep routine – start going to bed and getting up an hour or two earlier or later than usual (in line with the time of your destination)

Don’t

eat large meals, exercise, use electronic gadgets, or drink alcohol or caffeinated drinks before bedtime

During your flight

DO

drink plenty of water
sleep if it’s a normal time for sleeping at your destination
use an eye mask and earplugs if they help you sleep
keep active by stretching and regularly walking around the cabin

Don’t

drink too much caffeine or alcohol – they can make jet lag worse

After you arrive

Do

change your sleep schedule to the new time zone as quickly as possible
set an alarm to avoid oversleeping in the morning
go outside during the day – natural light will help your body clock adjust

Don’t

go to sleep until a reasonable hour for your new destination

If your trip is short (2 to 3 days) it may be better to stay on “home time”.

If possible, eat and sleep at the times you would at home.

Medicines aren’t usually needed for jet lag.

Symptoms often improve after a few days as your body clock adjusts to the new time zone.

Sleeping tablets may be helpful if you’re having problems sleeping (insomnia). They can be addictive so should only be used for a short time and if symptoms are severe.

Melatonin is a chemical released by the body in the evening to let your brain know it’s time to sleep. Melatonin supplements can be used but aren’t recommended for jet lag because there isn’t enough evidence that they work.

Symptoms of jet lag

The main symptoms are sleep-related. They include:

difficulty sleeping at bedtime and waking up in the morning
tiredness and exhaustion
finding it difficult to stay awake during the day
poor sleep quality
concentration and memory problems
Jet lag can also be associated with indigestion, constipation, diarrhoea and bloating.

Side Effects

Like all medicines, this medicine cancause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

If you experience any of the following serious side effcts, stop taking the
medicine and contact your doctorimmediately:

Uncommon: (may affect up to 1 in 100 people)
– Chest pain
Rare: (may affect up to 1 in 1000 people)
– Loss of consciousness or fainting
– Severe chest pain due to angina
– Feeling your heartbeat
– Depression
– Visual impairment
– Blurred vision
– Disorientation
– Vertigo (a feeling of dizziness or
“spinning”)
– Presence of red blood cells in the
urine
– Reduced number of white blood
cells in the blood
– Reduced blood platelets, which
increases risk of bleeding or
bruising
– psoriasis
If you experience any of the following non-serious side effects contact your
doctor and/or seek medical advice:

For a full list of side effects please see patient information leaflet.

Further Information